Singapore Government

Health Promotion Board

National Immunisation Registry

FAQ

FAQ - All about Laws & Regulations in Immunisation
1 How does the NIR get vaccination records?
2 Is there a governing body for immunisation in Singapore?
3 Is there a penalty for not vaccinating my child against Diphtheria?
4 Is there a penalty for not vaccinating my child against Measles?
5 When was Diphtheria and Measles became compulsory in Singapore?
6 When was measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine introduced?
7 When was the law changed for Small pox vaccination?
8 When was the two-dose MMR vaccination schedule introduced?
   
1. How does the NIR get vaccination records?
  Under the Infectious Disease Act, doctors are required to notify the NIR of vaccinations given.
 
2. Is there a governing body for immunisation in Singapore?
  Yes. The National Childhood Immunisation Programme has been implemented based on recommendations of the Expert Committee on Immunisation, comprising of Ministry of Health senior officials, consultant paediatricians and experts in communicable disease.

This national committee meets regularly to monitor and review the childhood immunisation programme in Singapore. The committee also follows closely recommendations from World Health Organisation (WHO).

The reason why Singapore is now free from most vaccine-preventable diseases is because of the effective and successful vaccination programme in Singapore.
 
3. Is there a penalty for not vaccinating my child against Diphtheria?
  Vaccination against Diphtheria is the requirement of the law. To quote the Infectious Disease (Diphtheria and Measles vaccination) Regulations of the Infectious Diseases Act:

"Primary diphtheria vaccination
The parent or guardian of every child in Singapore shall ensure that the child completes a course of primary diphtheria vaccination -
(a) within 12 months of the birth of the child; or
(b) within 12 months after the arrival of the child in Singapore, if the parent or guardian cannot produce any evidence to show that the child has already been so vaccinated....

Booster diphtheria vaccination
In the case of every child residing in Singapore who has received primary diphtheria vaccination, booster diphtheria vaccination consisting of one injection shall be compulsory -
(a) 12 months after the primary diphtheria vaccination; and
(b) within 12 months after the child has attained the age of 6 years,
except that paragraph (b) shall not apply if the child has already received the first booster diphtheria vaccination within a period of not more than two years before attaining the age of 6 years."

This is the responsibility of the parent or guardian.

The Infectious Diseases Act states that any person guilty of an offence shall in the case of the first offence, be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $10,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months or both.

Our strategy is to work with parents to have every child vaccinated on time.
 
4. Is there a penalty for not vaccinating my child against Measles?
  Vaccination against Measles is the requirement of the law. To quote the Infectious Disease (Diphtheria and Measles vaccination) Regulations of the Infectious Diseases Act:

"The parent or guardian of every child born in Singapore shall take or cause the child to be taken to a medical practitioner to be vaccinated against measles when the child is between one year and two years of age....

If the child is born outside Singapore, but the parent or guardian cannot produce any documentary evidence to show that the child has either previously contracted measles or has been vaccinated against measles, the parent or guardian of the child shall take or cause the child to be taken to a medical practitioner to be vaccinated against measles within 12 months after the arrival of the child in Singapore."

This is the responsibility of the parent or guardian.

The Infectious Diseases Act states that any person guilty of an offence shall in the case of the first offence, be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $10,000 or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 6 months or both.

Our strategy is to work with parents to have every child vaccinated on time.
 
5. When was Diphtheria and Measles became compulsory in Singapore?
  Diphtheria was made compulsory in 1977. Measles vaccination was introduced from Oct 1976 and made compulsory in August 1985 for children ages 1-2years.
 
6. When was measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine introduced?
  The monovalent measles vaccine was replaced by the trivalent measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in January 1990.
 
7. When was the law changed for Small pox vaccination?
  Small pox was compulsory by law for all children before the age of 1 year until 1981.
 
8. When was the two-dose MMR vaccination schedule introduced?
  In January 1998, the two-dose MMR vaccination schedule was introduced with the second dose given to primary school leavers (11+ years old).